Our Timeline

1955

Thornybush is fenced and becomes one of the first private nature reserves in the Greater Kruger Park

1961

Game Lodge opens its doors and becomes the first commercial Thornybush lodge.

1990

Lodge football league is founded by Thornybush Game Lodge foreman Elijah.

1992

Elephants are introduced to Thornybush Nature Reserve and N’kaya, Shumbalala, Serondella and Monwana all open.

1993

Thornybush is proclaimed a nature reserve in April, the first recording of a white wildebeest born naturally in the wild takes place at Thornybush and bushbabies from Natal are released and studied in the reserve.

1994

The successful reintroduction of cheetah.

1995

Jackalberry Lodge opens.

1997

The Thornybush Community Computer Centre is setup.

1998

Thornybush, then known as Inzalo, acquires Thornybush Game Lodge including 821 hectares of nature reserve.

2000

Waterbuck Lodge opens.

2001

Simbambili Lodge opens.

2002

Ian Beuchamp appointed as Inzalo CEO.

2007

Inzalo rebrands as Thornybush Collection and acquires Chapungu Tented Camp opening up another 83 hectares of nature reserve, with Nic Griffin appointed as Inzalo CEO.

2009

The River Lodge opens.

2010

Thornybush becomes the first lowveld reserve to treat rhino horn as a form of tackling rhino poaching.

2011

Waterside Lodge opens.

2017

Thornybush Nature Reserve drops its fences and becomes part of the Greater Kruger, welcoming a new era for the reserve’s biodiversity.

2019

Saseka Tented Camp opens, Thornybush Collection rebrands as Thornybush and Joanne Dickson is appointed as CEO.

Stories/Blog

A Fond Farewell to Nic Griffin

After 12 years at the helm of Thornybush, Nic Griffin has reached a well earned retirement. We reflect on Nic’s incredible achievements and bid him a happy reti

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Thornybush Community Projects

Thornybush is dedicated to making sure that we uplift, empower and invest in the local communities from the surrounding areas. Find out what we’re currently inv

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Thornybush Joins the Greater Kruger National Park

Thornybush forms part of the Greater Kruger National Park, which allows the free movement of animals across 19,485 square kilometres (7,523 sq mi) of land.

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Wild Shots Community Program

Thornybush was privileged to host a group of young photographers from the Wild Shots Outreach Program for photography lessons and workshops to promote creativit

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Your First Safari in Africa – What You Need To Know

If you’ve never been on safari before, you may have a few questions around what to expect. Find out all you need to know for your first visit to an African Game

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